Explore Falmouth of Stafford

Visit historic Falmouth for a weekend of fun, family friendly and educational events. Come back often as we add more information

September 8th – 9th, 2018

See the re-enactor groups participating
  • Civil War Balloon Thaddeus Lowe
  • Army of Potomac’s Civil War Impress Association
  • 47th VA
  • US Christians commission
  • Edenton Bell Battery
  • 54th Mass Co.B / 23rd USCT
  • 28th MASS Irish Brigade
  • Evergreen Shade Civil War Musician
  • 8th VA chaplain
  • Civil War Civilians of Spottsylvania
  • Capt Lewis Volunteers (Naval Blacksmith unit)
  • Yankees in Falmouth Photographer (Jeromie Stephens)
  • 3rd U.S. Regular
  • 8th Virginia
  • Mathew Brady impressionist
  • Lucy Walker “Cloths line Telegraph”
  • Irish Brigade Camp #4 SUVCW
  • Doc Peters (AoPCWIA)
  • Confederate drummer
  • Period Telegraph
  • Stephen R. Mallory, Secretary of Confederate Navy
  • 2nd Corps Field Hospital CSA
  • 4th VA Company I
  • The Dixie Rose Relief Society
  • Lee’s Lieutenants
  • Eric Buckland (Author and expert on Col Mosby
  • Shenandoah Valley Civil War Era Dancers
  • Mary Walker Civil War Female Surgeon (Yankees in Falmouth Ramrod!)
  • 12th U.S. Regular enlisted on duty to Prof Lowe
  • Women of the American Civil War
Belmont to Ferry Farm Trail at Historic Port of Falmouth

The Historic Port of Falmouth is home to Gari Melchers Home and Studio at Belmont, the Moncure Conway House, Shelton’s Cottage, and the Belmont to Ferry Farm Trail.

The Historic Port of Falmouth is a wonderful place to enjoy the beauty of the Rappahannock River. The area is a great place to fish, and is equipped with picnic areas. This park also holds historical significance as the entry way for ships and commerce during the colonial era and the crossing area for thousands of enslaved people escaping to freedom in Falmouth beginning in April of 1862. A historic site with layers of history. One little known but important story was the self-emancipation of more than 10,000 enslaved people. When Union Forces occupied Falmouth during the Civil War, the area’s White population fled. Beginning in April of 1862 thousands of enslaved people crossed the Rappahannock River from Fredericksburg to Falmouth, heading to freedom. John Washington crossed here and kept a diary of his journey to freedom. Excerpts of this poignant and powerful diary can be found at TrailToFreedom.com.

Gari Melchers was one of the most successful painters of his time, sought out by the rich and famous.  She was a beautiful, young art student, and his biggest fan.  They fell in love on an ocean liner and spent their lives sharing art. More than a hundred years later, the story of Gari and Corinne Melchers lives on in their home, Belmont. Be a part of this story.  Come and explore this unique historic home, tour stunning studio and art galleries, visit the restored gardens, shop in our museum store, and explore our trails. A National Historic Landmark, Gari Melchers Home and Studio is one of just 30 of America’s most significant artists’ spaces included in the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Historic Artists’ Homes and Studios consortium. The Museum Shop is the official home of the Stafford County Visitor Center, where visitors can find information about Stafford County attractions, restaurants, hotels, and other amenities.

The Moncure Conway House is one of Stafford’s Historical Treasures. The home was associated with the Vass and Beale families. It was the boyhood home of Moncure Daniel Conway, the South’s most prominent abolitionist. During the Civil War it was used as a Union Hospital. The home is currently a private residence. The current owner, Norman Schools, has made heroic efforts to restore the house to historical prominence. He has received recognition for his efforts. Yearly, he allows the house and grounds to be used for a wide variety of historic activities, including Stafford’s annual living history event “Yankees in Falmouth…and some Confederates too!”. This event includes cannon fires, demonstrations, and the Cannon Run 4 Miler, which is part of Stafford Tourism’s Race Series.

Shelton Cottage in Falmouth along River Road stands in contrast to Basil Gordon House and Moncure Conway House (houses of prosperous merchants and businessmen). It represents what a colonial workingman might aspire to possess in his own right – a far cry from his peers in Great Britain. It was moved to its present location by members of the Stafford County Historical Society to save it from periodic flooding.

On the Belmont to Ferry Farm Trail, enjoy a two-mile hike through three public parks in southern Stafford County. Scenic beauty surrounds you as the path winds through the Gari Melchers Home and Studio at Belmont, Historic Port of Falmouth, the Moncure Conway House, and Shelton’s Cottage. The Path is fully paved and provides scenic historical stops along the way. Hike it, walk it, bike it. It is pet and kid friendly!

The Stafford Civil War Park

This 41 acre park provides detailed interpretation of the Union Army’s winter occupation of Stafford County from 1862-1863 and preserves encampment sites, multiple corduroy roads, and 3 artillery fortifications as well as the pre-Civil War sandstone bridge and Colonial quarry.

After taking over  13,000 casualties in the December  1862 Battle of Fredericksburg , and followed in  January  1863 by the humiliation known ever since as  simply  the “Mud March,” the Union Army of the Potomac  was  disheartened , demoralized ,  and often losing 200 men a night to desertion. This park tells the story of over 130,000 Union soldiers who encamped in and around Stafford that winter. More than 3000 of them died from multiple diseases, exposure, and accidents. But those who survived under new leadership rebuilt this Army and left the Stafford encampments in June of 1863 to fight and later win at Gettysburg and beyond.  Most of the Stafford encampments were long ago lost to farming and development. However, this recently opened park preserves many very visible encampment remains including winter hut and tent sites, chimneys, defensive positions, and the largest gun battery fortifications in the Fredericksburg Region. All of these have rebuilt gun platforms with cannons representative of the period.

The Stafford Civil War Park provides beautiful trails and Civil War history you don’t want to miss.This 41 acre park provides detailed interpretation of the Union Army’s winter occupation of Stafford County from 1862-1863 and preserves encampment sites, multiple corduroy roads, and 3 artillery fortifications as well as the pre-Civil War sandstone bridge and Colonial quarry.

After taking over  13,000 casualties in the December  1862 Battle of Fredericksburg , and followed in  January  1863 by the humiliation known ever since as  simply  the “Mud March,” the Union Army of the Potomac  was  disheartened , demoralized ,  and often losing 200 men a night to desertion. This park tells the story of over 130,000 Union soldiers who encamped in and around Stafford that winter. More than 3000 of them died from multiple diseases, exposure, and accidents. But those who survived under new leadership rebuilt this Army and left the Stafford encampments in June of 1863 to fight and later win at Gettysburg and beyond.  Most of the Stafford encampments were long ago lost to farming and development. However, this recently opened park preserves many very visible encampment remains including winter hut and tent sites, chimneys, defensive positions, and the largest gun battery fortifications in the Fredericksburg Region. All of these have rebuilt gun platforms with cannons representative of the period.

The Stafford Civil War Park provides beautiful trails and Civil War history you don’t want to miss.

Embrace Civil War History in Stafford, VA

Cannon Run

Run or walk the inaugural 4 mile race!